A Concentration on Connection

I circled back to Event Factory to try and unravel one of the major themes I see woven into The Ravickians: it’s the idea of abandonment and connection. Amini seems fixated on connection, on having meaningful relationships with other people. Furthermore, she seems focused on the quantity of people in Ravicka — at one point in The Ravickians, she tells us about the results of a recent census (she writes that no one has died, but not one has joined the city either for some time, and it seems to trouble her).

Similarly, our traveler in Event Factory seems to have a heightened sense of emotion and interest surrounding these areas; she looks for people in the city, comments on its emptiness, and — when faced with another human being — seems desperate for connection and understanding. At one point in the in the text, she comments on Dar’s absence after they’ve left the underground city: “Did I still have a companion, my guide?” and later: “As long as there was the possibility that she was still behind me, I could walk the next hundred blocks” (65). Her ability to function well and move forward seems to hinge on human companionship. Accordingly, there are strong parallels between what the respective narrators of these texts focus on. Amini returns again and again to the idea of Ana and what it means to communicate with her, and places great weight on her interactions with people (the lady on the train, for example). I think about the experience she had digging through the rubble by the opera house, too: she writes, “My heart was left with that pile” — and wishes that whoever had left the film reels behind had shared more details about them. There is a focus on people, on knowing their stories, on sharing a story with them. 

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